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Self Bleeding Radiator Valves

Self bleeding radiator valves automatically vent the air from your radiators negating the need for manual bleeding which is a messy and time consuming DIY job that most people could do without. By fitting these valves you can rest assured that the air will stay out of your radiators helping your system to run much more efficiently.

How do I know if my radiators need bleeding?

You will normally notice one of two things, that your radiator feels cold and the top and hot at the bottom which means that there is air trapped inside. The other thing you may notice is a banging noise which is particularly noticeable when you first turn your heating on in the morning or evening.

Why do I need to get the air out of my heating system?

If you have air in your system then it needs to work much harder to achieve the temperature you require in your home. air also causes your pipes to corrode much more quickly in fact whichever way you look at it it will end up costing you more money. Why pay more for your heating when you don't need to?

How does a self bleeding radiator valve work?

In simple terms once fitted the valve will open to let any air escape. As water hits the valve it automatically shuts so that no water escapes to ensure there is no leakage, as air enters the radiator this is repeated again. After initial installation it can take a little while for the valve to vent all of the air so you need to be patient and resist the temptation to manually bleed. Once the air is removed you can leave well alone and need never manually bleed your radiator again.

How many valves do I need?

This depends on the size of your home and the level of problem you are getting but for most 3 bedroom homes you will need two valves one upstairs and one downstairs, preferable the first valve is fitted to the radiator that feeds off of the boiler. If you have a problem radiator then we would suggest fitting a valve to this particular one as well.

If you have a larger sized property or have a lot of problems with air entering the system then we would recommend more. some of our customers have them fitted to every radiator in their homes but this is normally not necessary. If you are unsure then we would recommend you start with two and judge it from there.

What if I am still getting problems?

If you are still getting air in your radiators then please call us in the first instance and we can help to ascertain whether this is a valve problem. It may be that there is some underlying problem somewhere else in which case you would need to consult with your local plumber.

Types of Self Bleeding Radiator Valves

There are two different types of self bleeding radiator valves the first is called a HV30C this valve fits most modern radiators for older style radiators the Micro will usually fit, it comes with a range of adaptors to fit different types of radiator. There are some very rare cases where the Micro or HV30C do not fit but these are few and far between. If you are unsure then you can always purchase and return for a refund if they turn out not to fit.


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Heating Facts

Fresh water entering a heating system contains about 15% air by volume which is just one cause of air in your radiators.

Heating and hot water accounts for over 80% of the energy consumption in the average home.

Controls to reduce the average temperature in the house by 1°C, will reduce consumption by up to 10%.

 

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